Tag: Ratan

shuktara - Sanjay and Ratan

Sanjay and Ratan

shuktara - Sanjay and Ratan
Ratan needs full time care and attention 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. For this we have a full time carer. When he goes to see his family, we all help.

This means washing him, feeding him, changing his nappies and sitting with him holding his hand.

He wakes up smiling every morning and his giggles can be heard throughout the day, unless he needs a bowel movement – then the laughing stops, until that’s done. Then it starts again.

If you feel that you would like to be part of helping us to help him, visit our “DONATE” page, where there are lots of options to help not only Ratan, but all the boys, girls and young people who live in our homes.
THANK YOU
shuktara.org/donate/

Rakhi at shuktara

Every year in August the 'sisters' of shuktara come to the boys home and tie rakhi on the wrists of their 'brothers' to show their affection. Across most of India the same thing happens - with brothers and sisters who are related by blood but also when that strong family bond is felt between unrelated people. It is a celebration that everyone at shuktara can participate in, and everyone enjoys this festival immensely.

[from Wikipedia] Raksha Bandhan in Sanskrit literally means "the tie or knot of protection". The word Raksha means protection, whilst Bandhan is the verb to tie. It is an ancient Hindu festival that ritually celebrates the love and duty between brothers and their sisters. The sister performs a Rakhi ceremony, then prays to express her love and her wish for the well being of her brother; in return, the brother ritually pledges to protect and take care of his sister under all circumstances.

The festival is also an occasion to celebrate brother-sister like family ties between cousins or distant family members, sometimes between biologically unrelated men and women. To many, the festival transcends biological family, brings together men and women across religions, diverse ethnic groups and ritually emphasizes harmony and love. It is observed in the Hindu calendar month of Śrāvaṇa, and typically falls in August every year.